LinkedIn Messenger Receives New Voice Recording Feature

Users of LinkedIn Messenger can now tap and hold to record voice messages of up to one minute long. The feature means users don’t have to leave the service to find messaging tools.

Last week we reported on a slew of new LinkedIn messaging features that are coming to and . Yesterday the -owned company continued its messaging revolution with more abilities. Significantly, users can now send voice messages in Messaging. This is a major addition for LinkedIn and allows it to more robustly compete with . The feature allows users to send WhatsApp style voice messages, although these are capped at one-minute. It is definitely worth remembering that LinkedIn is not a dedicated messaging service, so this is a very welcome ability. To send a voice messages, tap the microphone icon located on the messaging keyboard. Like on WhatsApp, users tap and hold the icon to record a voice message and then release to send. The ability to cancel a message mid-recording is achieved by simply sliding a finger away from the mic icon.

Necessary Feature

Some would argue this feature is not necessary for the network, but I disagree. While LinkedIn is not a messaging service, making its communication infrastructure more robust means users don't have to leave the service to get strong messaging tools. The company explains why it has included voice messaging:
  • Easily message on-the-go: People speak about four times faster than they type, making voice messaging great for explaining longer or more complex ideas without the time and involvement of typing and editing a message. It's also helpful for when you're on the move and don't have time to stop and type.
  • Get to it when you can: Leaving a voice message can often better for a recipient than calling them since they can listen and respond when they have a free moment.
  • Better express yourself: Speaking in your own voice allows you to build a more personal connection and effectively communicate. It's easier for your tone and personality to come through, which can sometimes get lost in translation in written communications.