Typescript website screenshot

Last month, Microsoft rolled out TypeScript 3.4, the latest version of its developer language for scaled-up JavaScript. As I wrote at the time, the language is becoming increasingly popular with developers, but could it be on the path to replacing JavaScript?

TypeScript is becoming popular in the development community because it gives dev’s easy tools for scaling up projects written in JavaScript. This achieved as a compiler tool with security and check programs based on static arrays, strings, text, and numbers. TypeScript is an excellent choice for finding errors in JavaScript code.

There is certainly growing evidence to suggest TypeScript is now becoming an essential tool for developers. Analyst firm RedMonk revealed recently TypeScript is now the 12th most used programming language on GitHub and Stack Overflow.

Sure, it has some ways to go to catch JavaScript, which is comfortably the most popular language at the moment. However, a survey of 33,000 dev’s who use npm (a widely used Node.js package for website development) shows an continued migration to Microsoft’s JavaScript subset.

63 percent of participants said they use TypeScript.

“Overall, 36 percent of npm users are writing TypeScript some or most of the time. That a third of the users in the JavaScript community are writing a totally new flavor of JavaScript should make everyone sit up and take notice,” npm developers say in the survey report.

Continued Development

It seems Microsoft’s open source language is here to stay. With the launch of TypeScript 3.4 last month, the company expanded the capabilities of the dev tool.

It is worth noting that TypeScript editor is still only available in Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code when editing JavaScript files.