Back in July, Microsoft acquired cloud security firm CloudKnox to bolster protection on the Microsoft Azure platform. This week, Microsoft is back to explain exactly how CloudKnox will work on Azure and how the service will function moving forward. Specifically, Microsoft says CloudKnox will continue to be available as a separate product for new and existing customers. For those who are using the service outside Azure, “sales, engineering, and service support” will now come from Microsoft. Pricing will also remain the same, says Alex Simons, corporate vice president for identity program management at Microsoft. Instead of lock down the service to Azure exclusivity, CloudKnox will continue as a multi-cloud security tool:
Image: CloudKnox office

Microsoft 365 customers will soon have a feature they may not really want. Specifically, Microsoft is roadmapping a tool to allow deeper employer spying through the Microsoft Edge browser. Essentially, Microsoft is allowing admins to have greater visibility, which could mean more surveillance on employees.

It is shown in the roadmap item titled: “Microsoft 365 compliance center: Insider risk management — Increased visibility on browsers.”

Microsoft says the tool will being betting management of “risky activity” and that employees often access sensitive information: “Web browsers are often used by users to access both sensitive and non-sensitive files within an organization.”

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With the new Microsoft Feature, admins will access compliance monitoring through Microsoft Edge. This means when a user copies files on their personal file sharing platform, or “files printed to local or network devices, files transferred or copied to a network share, files copied to USB devices.”

Right or Wrong?

What does an increase in visibility mean? Well, Microsoft is employing machine learning to track employees using Microsoft Edge and observe them. This is sure to go down very well with employees who already think companies watch over them too much.

There is a fine line between maintaining privacy and needing to ensure security across an organization. One of the problems is where that line is will often be defined by the company. Employees are increasingly given no say in how much of their privacy they are giving up.

It certainly makes sense for organizations to protect themselves, but how far into the personal user habits of individuals should they go?

Tip of the day: If your PC keeps connecting to the wrong WiFi network, you can set WiFi priority to avoid the need to manually select access points over and over again.

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