Last week, Microsoft announced it is ditching Windows 10X before the modular Windows platform could even launch. Opinions are divided on whether this was a good decision. Either way, Microsoft says it is continuing to embark on major changes for Windows, starting with Windows 10 Sun Valley (21H2).

Talking about divided opinions, there are two ways at looking at the demise of Windows 10X. Windows 10X was exactly that, a modular Windows that moves across form factors. So, some are disappointed that Microsoft has dropped the SKU.

On the other side of the fence are those who believe if Microsoft wants a Windows 10 to skew all forms of hardware, why not build those changes into the full Windows 10 experience? These users argue previous attempts at a lesser Windows service (Windows RT and Windows 10 S) have failed.

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No matter the side of the argument, most users want Microsoft to expand the capabilities of Windows and make the platform effective across devices. Despite ditching Windows 10X, all the noise from Microsoft has been the elements from the SKU will be folded into Windows 10 proper.

Changing the UX

That will start with Windows 10 Sun Valley, which we already know will have a design overhaul. In a recent job posting, Microsoft points to the new Windows 10X-inspired design as a major shift for the Windows OS:

“The Interactive eXperiences Platform (IXP) Team in Windows is responsible for the core Composition, Rendering and Input platforms that the UX of Windows and all Windows apps is built upon; from the Windows Start Menu, to Office, from Edge to your favorite Windows apps. We also own much of the Win32 API and infrastructure underlying all Windows features and apps. This team brought Touch to Windows, Precision Touchpads to Windows Laptops, and Windows Ink to the 2:1 device. We are now on a multi-year journey to revolutionize the Windows UX platform by delivering best interactive experiences, showcasing cutting-edge hardware.”

It seems Project Reunion, Microsoft’s service for unifying app development on Windows 10, will drive the change in how the platform looks and feels:

“We have a great opportunity for a Program Manager in our team to help define, design, plan, build major improvements to the Windows UX platform, and deliver future OS technologies and features via Project Reunion. You will help many parties learn and adopt our new platform innovations, including 1st party OS and application teams across Microsoft, as well as many 3rd party app vendors and developer communities.”

Tip of the day: Do you get flooded by notifications in Windows 10 from apps and want to disable them completely or just the notification sound? Our tutorial shows you how to do this. As an alternative you can also configure Windows 10 Focus Assist (Do Not Disturb Mode) and set quiet hours.

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