HomeWinBuzzer NewsWindows November 2022 Updates Are Crashing Apps Using DirectX and Direct3D

Windows November 2022 Updates Are Crashing Apps Using DirectX and Direct3D

The issue might happen intermittently and affects apps that use DirectX or Direct3D to render part or all of their content.

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has confirmed a new issue on Windows causing apps to crash after the November KB5019980 update.

According to the company, it affects outdated Intel GPU drivers, causing apps using DirectX or Direct3D to experience problems. “After installing KB5019980, you might receive an error with apphelp.dll on Windows devices using Intel graphics drivers with versions 26.20.100.7463 up to 30.0.101.1190,” explains Microsoft.

Apps using DirectX or Direct3D Affected

“This issue might happen intermittently and affects apps that use DirectX or Direct3D to render part or all of their content.” The problem affects Windows Server 2022 platform and different client Windows platforms, including , version 22H2; , version 22H2; Windows 11, version 21H2; Windows 10, version 21H2; Windows 10, version 20H2; and Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2019.

Microsoft assures everyone that it is already working on a solution and will give an update in an upcoming release. For now, it recommends users resort to a temporary fix involving updating their Intel graphics driver. “To mitigate this issue, you can install an Intel graphics driver with a later version than 30.0.101.1190,” says the software company.

“It is recommended to check your Windows device manufacturer's support for the latest version of the Intel graphics driver for your device. If they do not offer a driver later than 30.0.101.1190, you can check List of Drivers for Intel Graphics for information on how to download and install the latest Intel graphics driver available from Intel directly.”

 

Tip of the day: When using your Windows 10 laptop or convertible with a mobile hotspot you might want to limit the Internet bandwidth your PC uses. In our tutorial we are showing you how to set up a metered connection in Windows 11 or Windows 10 and how to turn it off again, if needed.

SourceMicrosoft
Markus Kasanmascheff
Markus Kasanmascheff
Markus is the founder of WinBuzzer and has been playing with Windows and technology for more than 25 years. He is holding a Master´s degree in International Economics and previously worked as Lead Windows Expert for Softonic.com.

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