Start-Menu-Folders-Windows-11-2022-Update

Microsoft is investigating a new bug that is affecting both Windows 11 and Windows 10. While this issue is not public yet, reports suggest Microsoft is looking into reports from users about the “unresponsive Start menu and task bar”.

Essentially, the bug seems to be making components of Windows 11 and Windows 10 unclickable, including the Start menu, task bar, and Search bar. It seems Barco’s ClickShare app is causing the issue, specifically the Calendar integration.

This problem is not new and was first reported last year. Belgian firm Barco has already sent out an update and a public advisory for the flaw. According to the company, Microsoft is now investigating the matter under the tracking number “41322218”.

If you are unfamiliar with ClickShare, it is a popular app for wireless conferencing and is used by enterprises.

Barco writes:

“The issue is under investigation with Microsoft Windows team but it still is good to take up contact directly with Microsoft Windows team to flag this issue. Make sure to mention for ticket submission the tittle “unresponsive start menu or task bar” and refer to Microsoft internal bug number: 41322218”

Microsoft’s Fault?

The company says the bug is caused on Microsoft’s end, because of changes with the ClickShare app on Outlook Calendar within the Outlook API:

“More investigation has shown that the windows taskbar issue occurs when the User Shell Registry has been modified for some reason (e.g. windows update, change password, any Apps using Microsoft Outlook API or other).

We have analyzed possible relations with the ClickShare App more in-depth and we can confirm that ClickShare does not modify Windows Registry values or permissions from the App. The ClickShare App only reads Microsoft Outlook Calendar via the Microsoft Outlook API for the One Click Join feature.

The problem with the unresponsive Windows taskbar, therefore, is not a ClickShare App issue. It is related to Microsoft and it can be triggered by any application using the Microsoft Outlook API.”

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