Windows-11-Desktop-WinBuzzer

Microsoft has confirmed that it accidentally sent out a buggy update to both Windows 11 (21H2) and Windows 10 (21H2) as part of August 2022 Patch Tuesday. Within that cumulative update was a fix for a Secure Boot DBX GRUB vulnerability (KB5012170). However, this fix has been causing issues and Microsoft now admits it sent out a buggy patch to the wrong Windows users.

Microsoft’s fix was causing issues because it would not install, showing the error code “0x800f0922”. At the time, Microsoft was telling users to update UEFI to work around the issue. That did not really work as a couple of weeks later there was another issue in the same KB5012170 package. Users were noticing the update was forcing BitLocker into recovery mode.

Again, Microsoft offered a workaround but the problem is still listed on the Windows Health Dashboard. It is worth noting that originally this update was supposed to be for Windows 11 and Windows 10 users running the 21H2 release, which was the update for the latter half of 2021.

However, users of Windows 11 2022 Update (22H2) have been reporting they are also receiving the KB5012170 update. Microsoft has now confirmed that it did indeed send the update to both Windows 11 22H2 and Windows 10 22H2.

New Listing

Both updates are also listed on the support page for the update. This is a new development and it is unclear why Microsoft rolled out KB5012170 to newer Windows build when the company knows it is loaded with bugs. If this was an accident, why is Microsoft now listing Windows 22H2 builds under the update.

That list now shows that the buggy KB5012170 update affects the following Windows versions:

  • Windows Server 2012
  • Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Windows 10, version 1507
  • Windows 10, version 1607 and Windows Server 2016
  • Windows 10, version 1809 and Windows Server 2019
  • Windows 10, version 20H2
  • Windows 10, version 21H1
  • Windows 10, version 21H2
  • Windows 10, version 22H2
  • Windows Server 2022
  • Windows 11, version 21H2
  • Windows 11, version 22H2
  • Azure Stack HCI, version 1809
  • Azure Stack Data Box, version 1809 (ASDB)

Not the First Time

Of course, Microsoft has something of a history of rolling out buggy updates. Perhaps the most iconic of all broken Microsoft updates is the Windows 10 October 2018 Update (1809). Iconic for all the wrong reasons, the October 2018 Update had a host of issues.

Microsoft initially launched the platform on October 2 alongside new Surface devices. However, version 1809 was quickly put on ice as the manual update was deleting personal user files. Before being paused, the update was reaching millions of users.

After being pulled, users were affected by a ZIP extraction fault, a file association problem, and an activation downgrade flaw. Windows 10 1809 also got blocked for users running specific Intel drivers when it was re-released. Furthermore, Apple and Microsoft had to start working together to solve an iCloud bug affecting the build. This all happened within the space of around 6-8 weeks.

Windows 11 2022 Update is hardly much better and is one of the buggiest major releases in recent memory. Since launching in September the update has broken the Task Manager and is freezing when using Input Method Editor (IME).

There have been printer issues, broken Windows Hello, and problems with the SSL/TLS handshake. Last week, Microsoft confirmed a new issue affecting Windows 11 22H2 relating to the Remote Desktop.

Tip of the day: If you need to Create, Delete or Resize Partitions, Windows has everything you thanks to the built-in Disk Management-tool.