Back in September, I reported on a Phoronix test showing Linux Ubuntu 22.04 is outperforming Windows 11 when running the Ryzen 7 5800X3D. Well, it doesn’t seem things are any better for the new Windows 11 2022 Update compared to Ubuntu and Linux when running AMD’s Ryzen 9 7950X.

This test was once again conducted by Phoronix and shows Windows 11 2022 Update lag behind open source distros across several metrics.

“All of these tests were done on the same system featuring the AMD Ryzen 9 7950X running at its stock speeds (the clock difference on the system table just comes down to reporting differences between OS interfaces), the ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR X670E HERO motherboard with the latest 0703 BIOS, 2 x 16GB DDR5-6000 EXPO memory, Radeon RX 6800 XT graphics, and a 1TB Sabrent Rocket 4.0 Plus NVMe SSD.”

It seems on next-gen hardware from AMD, Windows 11 is losing its performance edge compared to Linux 6.0 kernel and Ubuntu 21.10. It is worth noting the test was done without 3D V-cache enabled. Admittedly, the results are closer to last month’s test but still cause for concern for Microsoft.

Tests

Let’s start by looking at benchmarks for Enterprise Edition (J2EE)-based DaCapo Java 2 Platform. In this Tradesoap test, Linux 6.0 simply walks all over Windows 11 22H2.

The results are closer in the Kvazaar HEVC video encoding test when using AMD’s optimised P-state performance governor configuration. This is the faster setting compared to the default. Windows 11 levels for video output were even with Linux, but the open-source OS won slightly in terms of video input.

One area where Windows 11 is using AMD’s 7950X resources better is in the path tracing test. Zstd compression test. Furthermore, Microsoft platforms is also the best performer in the Selenium Chromium benchmark.

It is worth heading to Phoronix at the source to see the complete multi-page comparison covering a multitude of tests.

Tip of the day: File History is a Windows back up feature that saves each version of files in the Documents, Pictures, Videos, Desktop, and Offline OneDrive folders. Though its name implies a primary focus on version control, you can actually use it as a fully-fledged backup tool for your important documents.