Featured - Windows 11 remote assistance. How to use Quick Assist to remotely troubleshoot PCs

When a friend or colleague has an issue with their computer, it’s easy enough to help out. You can sit down, take the reins and get to the root of the problem. When you can’t be there in person, however, things quickly get difficult. Explaining exactly what to do without direct control can be incredibly frustrating. Enter Quick Assist in Windows: a tool that grants you remote access to their PC.

What is Quick Assist?

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Windows Quick Assist is a tool for remote assistance in Windows 11 and Windows 10 based on Microsoft’s successful Remote Desktop Protocol. It lets a user take control of another computer without the need to touch it physically.

Windows 11 Quick Assist is often confused with “Windows Remote Assistance”, a tool offered in earlier Windows versions that has similar functionality. Quick Assist does have some minor upgrades, however, including the ability to use the helper’s keyboard layout and a pause button for the help session.

Critically, Quick Assist is very simple to use for both users. Today, we’ll be showing you how to set up Quick Assist in Windows 11 from both ends, as well as how to use Quick Assist once you’re connected. Let’s get started:

How to Set Up Quick Assist in Windows 11 or Windows 10

One of the major benefits using Quick Assist to take control of another computer is that it’s very fast to set up. Getting connected should only take a minute.

However, as a person receiving help, you do need to make sure that you fully trust the person who is repairing your computer. There are many scammers that use Quick Assist to show you false reports of viruses. A popular technique is to use the “tree” command in CMD and pretending its output means there are viruses.

If you believe you are being scammed, you should hang up immediately and consult this FTC page for guidance.

With that important warning, let’s get on with the guide:

  1. Open the Microsoft Quick Assist app

    To do this, press the Start button on your taskbar, then “Quick Assist” and click the top result.

    Windows 11 - Open Quick Assist

  2. Under the “Give assistance” heading, press “Assist another person”

     

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give assistance - Assist Another Person

  3. Enter your Microsoft account email and press “Next”

    Sadly, there’s no way around it – you do need a Microsoft account to provide remote assistance in Windows 11 via this tool.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Username - Next

  4. Enter your password and press “Sign in”

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Username - Password - Sign In

  5. Choose “Yes” or “No” on the “Stay signed in” screen

    Choosing “Yes” will prevent you from having to sign in every time you help somebody, but can be the wrong option if you’re using somebody else’s PC.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Stay Signed

  6. Press the “Copy to clipboard” text underneath your security code

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Copy Security Code

  7. Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Copy Security Code - Code Copied

  8. Message your friend or family member with the code

    You can paste the code by pressing Ctrl + V on your keyboard. You may also want to save it to a notepad or WordPad file in case you need it again later.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Copy Security C

  9. If you’re being helped: How to connect to Microsoft Quick Assist

    Press the Start button, type “Quick Assist”, and then press the top result, which should read “Quick Assist”.

    Remember, you must have a Windows 10 or Windows 11 PC to be able to use the Quick Assist app.

    Windows 11 - Open Quick Assist

  10. Enter the code in the box under the “Get assistance” heading and press “Share screen”

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Get Assistance - Copy Code from Assistance

  11. Press “Allow” on the “Share your screen” permission pop-up

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Get Assistance - Copy Code from Assistance - Allow

  12. Choose whether the helper can take full control of your PC or just view your screen

    Press “Continue” once you have chosen.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Choose a Sharing Option - Continue

How to Use Quick Assist in Windows 11 and Windows 10

One of the major benefits using Quick Assist to take control of another computer is that it’s very fast to set up. Getting connected should only take a minute.

However, as a person receiving help, you do need to make sure that you fully trust the person who is repairing your computer. There are many scammers that use Quick Assist to show you false reports of viruses. A popular technique is to use the “tree” command in CMD and pretending its output means there are viruses.

If you believe you are being scammed, you should hang up immediately and consult this FTC page for guidance.

With that important warning, let’s get on with the guide:

  1. Open the Microsoft Quick Assist app

    To do this, press the Start button on your taskbar, then “Quick Assist” and click the top result.

    Windows 11 - Open Quick Assist

  2. Under the “Give assistance” heading, press “Assist another person”

     

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give assistance - Assist Another Person

  3. Enter your Microsoft account email and press “Next”

    Sadly, there’s no way around it – you do need a Microsoft account to provide remote assistance in Windows 11 via this tool.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Username - Next

  4. Enter your password and press “Sign in”

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Username - Password - Sign In

  5. Choose “Yes” or “No” on the “Stay signed in” screen

    Choosing “Yes” will prevent you from having to sign in every time you help somebody, but can be the wrong option if you’re using somebody else’s PC.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Stay Signed

  6. Press the “Copy to clipboard” text underneath your security code

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Copy Security Code

  7. Wait for the “Copied to Clipboard” screen

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Copy Security Code - Code Copied

  8. Message your friend or family member with the code

    You can paste the code by pressing Ctrl + V on your keyboard. You may also want to save it to a notepad or WordPad file in case you need it again later.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Sign In - Copy Security C

  9. If you’re being helped: How to connect to Microsoft Quick Assist

    Press the Start button, type “Quick Assist”, and then press the top result, which should read “Quick Assist”.

    Remember, you must have a Windows 10 or Windows 11 PC to be able to use the Quick Assist app.

    Windows 11 - Open Quick Assist

  10. Enter the code in the box under the “Get assistance” heading and press “Share screen”

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Get Assistance - Copy Code from Assistance

  11. Press “Allow” on the “Share your screen” permission pop-up

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Get Assistance - Copy Code from Assistance - Allow

  12. Choose whether the helper can take full control of your PC or just view your screen

    Press “Continue” once you have chosen.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Choose a Sharing Option - Continue

How to Use Quick Assist in Windows 11 and Windows 10

Once you, the helper, have connected to a user’s PC, you’ll have several tools and options at your disposal, you can follow the steps below to learn how to use its features:

  1. The helper will be presented with this Remote Assist UI

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Screen

  2. The person being helped with see a box reading “Screen sharing on”

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Get Assistance - Screen

  3. Annotate on the screen for both parties with the pencil button

    This allows the helper to circle what the person in need of assistance should press or explain their actions.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Anotate

  4. Press the form icon to open Task Manager

    This button is useful because pressing the usual shortcut will likely just open Task Manager on your own PC.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Task Manager

  5. Press the circular arrow to restart the computer you’re controlling

    It’s important that you remember that this button restarts the PC rather than refreshes the connection. Thankfully, the Quick Assist connection will automatically re-open once the restart is complete, so you won’t lose too much time if you do press is accidentally.

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Restart

  6.  Press the pause or stop button to pause or stop the connection

    Windows 11 - Quick Assist - Give Assistance - Stop or Pause

  7. To stop receiving assistance, press the “X” or pause icon in the Quick Assist pop-up

    Windows 11 - Get Assistance - Stop Quick Assist

Extra: How to Use DISM and SFC Scannow to fix Windows problems

If you’re providing remote assistance in Windows 11, you may want to provide yourself with the DISM and SFC Scannow tools via our dedicated guide

Windows 10 - Command Line - sfc scannow

Extra: How to Perform a Clean Boot in Windows

Another useful tool in a technician’s arsenal is the ability to perform a clean boot in Windows 11 or Windows 10. Our clean boot guide will show you how to eliminate potential drivers and software conflicts and find out which service is causing an issue.

 

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