Windows-11-Desktop-WinBuzzer

Microsoft has started baking support for the DirectStorage API into Windows 10 since last month on versions 1909 and newer. However, with Windows 11, Microsoft is promising even more support and complete access to DirectStorage.

In a new developer blog post, the company says the full suite of the API’s features are coming to Windows 11:

  • “The new DirectStorage API programming model that provides a DX12-style batched submission/completion calling pattern, relieving apps from the need to individually manage thousands of IO requests/completion notifications per second
  • GPU decompression providing super-fast asset decompression for load time and streaming scenarios (coming in a later preview)
  • Storage stack optimizations: On Windows 11, this consists of an upgraded OS storage stack that unlocks the full potential of DirectStorage, and on Windows 10, games will still benefit from the more efficient use of the legacy OS storage stack.”

Details

Windows 10 and Windows 11 users will have access to the API, but Microsoft is clear that Windows 11 will provide additional benefits. This basically means Windows 11 will offer the fastest experience with fully optimized DirectStorage support.

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Microsoft had originally suggested the API would only be available on Windows 11. It is a feature that allows games to load quickly by working to load assets on the GPU, saving resources on the CPU. DirectStorage also helps to improve graphics and reduce load times.

Still, it is good to know the API will still bring benefits to Windows 10, including for older devices. Whether you run a device with a SSD or HDD, the API will work.

Tip of the day: Did you know that your data and privacy might be at risk if you run Windows 10 without encryption? A bootable USB with a live-linux distribution is often just enough to gain access to all of your files.

If you want to change that, check out our detailed BitLocker guide where we show you how to turn on encryption for your system disk or any other drive you might be using in your computer.

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