Microsoft’s recently launched Surface Pro 7+ has flown under the radar. That’s because it is an incremental upgrade from last year’s Surface Pro 7 and hardly the most exciting new product. However, the Surface Pro remains Microsoft’s flagship piece of hardware, or at least the one that is the most popular.

One of the problems Surface devices have had in the past is users cannot really upgrade them. That’s by design because Microsoft would rather customers by new models than futureproof their existing device. However, the company is offering one upgrade ability… storage replacement.

The company is now offering an SSD kit called a Microsoft Surface rSSDs, which allows users to change storage easily on the Surface Pro 7+. Essentially this means when one drive is full, users can simply change to a new one. Alternatively, if customers want to increase the storage on their device, they now can.

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SSD kits are one certified refurbished SSD with an SSD screw. Microsoft says 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, and 1TB options are available. At first, the kits are only available in the United States, but Microsoft promises a gradual release to all Surface markets in the future.

Installation

Surface Pro devices are notoriously difficult to open. So, does that mean the SSD kits cannot be installed by the device owner? Microsoft is at pains to point out that installing the kits is the work of a technician:

We recommend only a skilled IT technician perform the SSD replacement and while following Microsoft instructions in the Surface Pro 7+ removable SSD guide available on the Microsoft Download Center.

Another question in the company’s FAQ reads:

“Can I upgrade Surface Pro 7+ devices by installing larger SSDs, or do I have to replace them with the same size SSD that is removed?

While technically possible, Microsoft strongly discourages users from installing an SSD that has not been tested for your device configuration. Microsoft takes measures to ensure product quality and tests the hardware configurations offered for sale. Installing a non-Microsoft or a Microsoft SSD of a different volume than the one provided originally may lead to reduced performance and unsupported configurations.”

Tip of the day:

With many reachable wireless access points popping up and disappearing again, the available networks list can become quite annoying. If needed you can use the allowed and blocked filter list of Windows 10 to block certain WiFi networks or all unknown WiFi networks.

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