Apple likes to run a locked down ecosystem, whether its on macOS or iOS. There are some benefits to this approach, such as potential security, a smooth user experience, and good performance. However, sometimes Apple’s push for control can lead into areas of potential anti-trust concerns.

For example, the company has come under fire for not allowing users to third-party apps as defaults. According to Bloomberg, the company is responding to concerns from lawmakers and is considering making important changes to iOS.

On Cupertino’s mobile platform, users cannot select a third-party as a default. For example, web browsers. Users can download another browser, but Apple’s own Safar remains the default when a link is selected (like in an email).

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It is worth noting Google has received regulatory sanctions for similar practices in the past. It seems reasonable that Apple would have to adhere to the same rules. The report suggests before lawmakers hand out any punishments, the company will make necessary changes.

Potential Changes

While the following are only under considerations, those changes would be:

Default Apps – Apple could be prepared to let users select third-party apps as defaults. If this happened, it would be the first time on iOS. As mentioned, users can download third-party apps freely already. There are 38 default apps currently on iOS and developers find it hard to compete against them.

Less restrictions on third-party music apps – Spotify has already started antitrust proceedings against Apple over the company taking a 30% cut from subscriptions made through the App Store. In response, Cupertino is considering loosening these restrictions and could allow third-party music apps to be set as default.

Opening HomePod – Away from iOS, Apple is also weighing up allowing third-party music apps to run on its HomePod speaker.

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