Microsoft Logo Microsoft

Microsoft has continued its recent acquisition blitz and today confirmed it has purchased AdoptOpenJDK contributor JClarity. In an official announcement, Redmond said the acquisition will allow Microsoft to further improve Java workloads within its Azure cloud environment.

John Montgomery, VP of program management and developer tools and services, says Microsoft will work with JClarity to make Azure a better solution for Java users.

“Microsoft Azure and JClarity engineers will be working together to make Azure a better platform for our Java customers and internal teams, improving the experience … of the platform for Java developers and end-users,” said Montgomery. “At Microsoft, we strongly believe that we can do more for our customers by working alongside the Java community … The [JClarity] team, formed by Java champions and data scientists with proven expertise in data-driven Java Virtual Machine (JVM) optimizations, will help teams at Microsoft to leverage advancements in the Java platform.”

Microsoft has previously partnered with JClarity when in June 2018 the company sponsored the AdoptOpenJDK project. The initiative creates binaries for OpenJDK, which is a free open source solution of the Java Platform Standard Edition.

At the time, Microsoft committed to being a platinum sponsor of the project until the end of 2020.

Continued Java Support

Speaking of the acquisition, JClarity CEO Martijn Verbug said the company will continue to be a supporter of Java communities. Verbug has now become Java principal group manager for Microsoft.

“It’s always been JClarity’s core mission to support the Java ecosystem. We started with our world-class performance tooling and then later became a leader in the AdoptOpenJDK project,” said Verburg in a statement. “Microsoft leads the world in backing developers and their communities, and after speaking to their engineering and program leadership it was a no-brainer to enter formal discussions. With the passion and deep expertise of Microsoft’s people, we’ll be able to support the Java ecosystem better than ever before.”