Amazon is pressing ahead with its plans to bring global blanket broadband internet coverage delivered from space. The company’s Project Kuiper has sent documentation to the US government in a bid to have thousands of satellites launched into space.

That’s the amount of space hardware Amazon will need to initiate Project Kuiper. On July 4, the company submitted its satellite launch application to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Amazon wants the regulatory body to grant permission for the online retailer and cloud service giant to “launch and operate a non-geostationary satellite orbit system using Ka−band frequencies.” All the satellites will orbit the earth at a height of 366 to 391 miles.

“Submitting to the FCC is the first step – next, the FCC will thoroughly review our application and we look forward to working with them throughout this process,” an Amazon spokesperson said in an email to CNET today.

Project Kuiper is one of the most ambitious space programs in history. It would see the launch of 3,326 low Earth orbit satellites that will bring broadband coverage to the world.

“The Kuiper System will deliver satellite broadband communications services to tens of millions of unserved and underserved consumers and businesses in the United States and around the globe,” the permission filing reads.

Rivalry

Amazon does face some rivals in the space broadband race. For example, Elon Musk’s SpaceX has a similar project known as Starlink. Like Kuiper, the project aims to deliver broadband from space. Starlink is arguably further ahead than Amazon as it already launched its first group of satellites earlier this year.

British billionaire Richard Branson is also in the market and was in fact the first to launch space broadband delivery satellites through his OneWeb company.