Microsoft is a month away from releasing Windows 10 April 2019 Update (version 1903), but the company is still dealing with the last major Windows release. In a security bulletin, the company says it is developing a fix for a problem that was observed in the recent March 1 update for Windows 10 version 1809 (October 2018 Update).

Before getting into the details, I think it is worth noting the strange position Microsoft is finding itself in regarding Windows updates. Just a month away from the next feature update, the company is still dealing with the last. Yes, it is normal for updates to arrive constantly in-between builds, but Microsoft is having to housekeep for version 1809 due to problems.

Five months after it launched, the October 2018 Update still does not seem particularly stable.

The latest issue was causing major performance problems with several popular games. Microsoft says update KB4482887 is the cause of these issues for Windows 10 gamers. It is affecting both graphics performance and the way the mouse moves.

Problems

Two sizeable Reddit threads show the problem is affecting Destiny 2, and especially triple A titles from about a decade ago. Among them are Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 and Modern Warfare. At the moment, it does not look like the flaw affects titles release in 2018.

One Reddit user described the problem:

“This patch is causing massive lag spikes in older games, like CoD4 and CoD MW2.

Right after installing this update, I launch any of the two aforementioned games, moving the mouse around (yes, mouse movement) causes the game to freeze in 1 second intervals every time. If you don’t move the mouse, game appears fine.

Does not affect the modern titles I’ve tested: Battlefield V

Repro rate is 100%. I uninstalled KB4482887 and the issue went away. I reinstalled it and the issue came back.”

Microsoft officially acknowledged the problem on Thursday. Mirroring the actions of users, the company advises uninstalling KB4482887.

“As a short-term resolution, users can uninstall KB4482887 to regain performance,” Microsoft said.