Slack desktop app official

Slack is currently behind a barricade defending an onslaught from Microsoft Teams, especially on Windows. Still, Slack remains a popular business collaboration tool despite Microsoft’s clear threat. If you use the app on Windows 10, you can now pull in the latest update.

Slack on Windows 10 has been updated to Version 3.3.4, but it seems new features are not the order of the day. Instead of new functionality, users will have to make do with a more functional experience.

That’s because the update is focused on fixing bugs covering a range of issues. The release notes point to a fix for a bug that was showing two equal messages on login. Ironically, someone slipped or is having an ironic joke and put this fix twice in the changelog.

Elsewhere, a patch for a bug that made text highlighting harder has been issued, while Slack will now also correctly move to full screen from the keyboard shortcut.

Below is the full release note:

  • Users signing in with Single Sign-On would see the same message twice when logging in.
  • Users signing in with Single Sign-On would see the same message twice when logging in. This will not happen anymore.
  • When trying to select a portion of a code-formatted block of text (text formatted with ` or “` at either end), some characters were proving slippery and hard to select. You can now copy and paste to your heart’s content.
  • Several random, rare crashes — on launch and at other times — have been eliminated. More random and rare crashes inevitably exist, of course, and as soon as we know what they are, we’ll eliminate those too.
  • The full screen shortcut was mistakenly listed as ‘Ctrl+F’ instead of ‘Ctrl+Shift+F’ in the “View” menu. We both apologize for this and hope that, because of it, someone out there discovered ‘Ctrl+F’ as a useful shortcut for searching the channel that you’re in. Always look on the bright side of bugs.

Teams Surge

As we reported in December, Slack is under increasing pressure from Microsoft Teams. This is especially the case on Windows, where enterprise users can easily tap into Teams through Office 365. Considering most organizations have a Windows install base, Teams has enjoyed significant growth.

Microsoft introduced a free version of the service, a decision that had paid off. Spiceworks says adoption has soared since that introduction. Indeed, Teams was used by 329,000 companies in September, up from 200,000 in May.