Online code repository GitHub suffered a major outage late last night. The developer platform went down across the globe, causing confusion amongst users. As the service went dark, users were left unable to login or perform other tasks on the site.

In terms of GitHub, the service was affected by data storage problems. Specifically, the company’s status board highlighted multiple services affected by the issue: “We’re failing over a data storage system in order to restore access to GitHub.com.” 

Later the soon-to-be Microsoft owned company said it was working to solve the problem. Users were reporting they could not login to GitHub and other were missing commits.

“We are aware of how important our services are to your development workflows and are actively working to establish an estimated timeframe for full recovery. We will share this information with you as soon as it is available.”

The outage was caused by a problematic network partition that pushed the database to failure. GitHub says inconsistent information was on the website. Data protection was important during the outage. The company says it paused webhooks events and other internal processing to prevent data loss.

At the time of writing, the problem had been resolved and all data stores were expected to be operational again:

[07:56 am, ET] “The majority of restore processes have completed. We anticipate all data stores will be fully consistent within the next hour.”

Microsoft Acquisition

Microsoft is currently in the process of finalizing its $7.5 billion acquisition of GitHub. Last week, the deal cleared its final regulatory hurdle when the European Commission greenlit the transaction.

“The market investigation confirmed that Microsoft would not have the market power to undermine the open nature of GitHub to the detriment of competing DevOps tools and cloud services. This is because such behavior would reduce the value of GitHub for developers, who are willing and able to switch to other platforms,” the Commission said in a press release.

“Therefore, following its phase I investigation, the Commission concluded that the transaction would raise no competition concerns in any of the affected markets and cleared the case unconditionally.”