Surface Laptop

In case you missed the memo, Microsoft dropped some big education-focused bombs yesterday. At its May EDU event, the company announced Windows 10 S and the new Surface Laptop. Some controversy surrounded the laptop because it lacks a USB Type-C port. It seems Microsoft was once going to include a part, but changed its mind.

Ok, it seems rather pointless to be concerned over a lack of one component. However, a USB Type-C is an important port, and on a machine that costs $1000, it is very strange to see it omitted.

Of course, during the development of the Surface Laptop, Microsoft went through numerous prototypes. It seems that one of the earlier editions of the Windows 10 S machine did have a USB Type-C port.

A promotional video that made its way to YouTube shows one of these earlier devices. This was clearly an accident on Microsoft’s part, but the USB Type-C ports is clear to see.

Microsoft says it omitted a USB Type-C port for several reasons. Firstly, the company says the USB-C technology is still nascent and causing problems for cables and connections. Secondly, Microsoft says there has not yet been widespread market adoption.

Thirdly, the company says its target consumer-base for the Surface Laptop would make more use of a normal USB or mini DisplayPort.

Still, we have usually seen manufacturers mix up their ports with traditional USB and at least one Type-C. Microsoft clearly decided against that. Of course, if the USB Type-C market picks up, the company has an additional feature to add to a Surface Laptop sequel.

Surface Laptop

The Surface Laptop is a high-end machine that comes with a 13.5-inch screen with 3.4 million pixels. Microsoft says this is the thinnest LCD screen on any laptop.

Other specs from the product do not slouch either. The device can be configured up to a 7th Gen Intel Core i7, 8GB of RAM, and 1TB of PCI Express storage. There is a heavy price to pay, with the Surface Laptop costing $999 for the entry-level unit.

At that price and with its specs, the laptop is geared for anyone, and not just the education users Microsoft is pushing it at.