Microsoft is today celebrating the 15th anniversary of .NET. The first ever version of the service was launched a decade and a half ago on February 13, 2002. Upon release, it was a part of Visual Studio.NET, allowing developers to build and deploy apps.

When launched, .NET was part of Microsoft’s “Next Generation Windows Services” and has endured as Windows has changes over the 15 years in between. With .NET, developers can create web server and desktop applications through a managed framework.

Microsoft later launched ASP.NET to help web-based development alongside C#. Naturally, Microsoft has expanded the Windows ecosystem over the years, and .NET has adapted to the changes.

Now developers can create cross platform apps, games, web app, cloud services, and more. Microsoft has also created a  vibrant open-source community where you can participate in the direction of .NET. The company is continuing to develop .NET, as the company explains:

“With the release of Visual Studio 2017 coming on March 7th and Visual Studio’s 20th anniversary, .NET Core tools reach 1.0. Tune in March 7th and watch the keynote and live Q&A panels. A few nights ago we got together with the Microsoft Alumni Network and threw a big .NET birthday bash with former .NET team members & rock stars.”

Event Hubs .NET Standards

Just last week, Microsoft Event Hubs .NET Standard Client as an open source solution. It has been testing for months and lets developers have a single code base across runtimes. This means Event Hubs has its own library. Users no longer need to download the service bus library, making processes simpler to perform.