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Microsoft has decided it will not provide a successor for the standalone Service Bus for Windows Server 1.1. The platform is built from the Azure Service Bus Messaging service, which has 500 Billion message transactions a month. Microsoft says the decision is based on a continued shift into hybrid cloud solutions.

Service Bus for Windows Server 1.1 was available as a free download inside the Azure Pack. Microsoft says mainstream support for the service will end on January 9, 2018. The platform was a standalone from Azure Service Bus Messaging specifically for Windows Server 1.1.

In general, Microsoft says it is commitment to maintaining and strengthening Service Bus. The company also announced that it will cease delivery of Windows Server or Windows Client installable message brokers.

In its official Azure blog post, Microsoft reasons that hybrid solutions are the way forward. The company says it has analyzed market trends and sees an explosion in messaging platforms. Customers have enough choice from these myriad services, the company concludes.

Instead, Microsoft will focus on what it believes are the core strengths of Azure. Namely, the company will continue to create and maintain cloud-scale services that are suited to high-volume, high-velocity, consolidated message flows in and through the cloud. Azure Service Bus Messaging will remain part of this strategy.

“We believe that “hybrid” also means collaboration and integration to create a “better together” story of a healthy messaging platform ecosystem that fills all the niches across IT and IoT, and that leverages public cloud as a backplane and integration surface.”

Azure Service Bus Messaging

While Service Bus for Windows 1.1 will be the last of its kind, Microsoft will keep the underlying technology from Azure. The Azure Service Bus Messaging platform:

“We’re confident to state that Azure Service Bus, delivered from the nearest Azure datacenter over redundant network connectivity, is a choice far superior in terms of cost and reliability to most on-premises messaging cluster installations,” the company says. “Even if the core workloads run and remain in an on-premises environment.”