Skype Teams Graphics Microsoft

There has been considerable confusion over the so-called Slack killer, Microsoft Teams. At a keynote at Milk Studios in New York, the Redmond giant mentioned it was built on Skype several times.

For those unfamiliar, Microsoft Teams even used to have the same branding, and was previously ‘Skype Teams’. The application lets organizations message in separate channels while also integrating video calls, Office 365 and more.

Not Skype for Business

The natural assumption was use of Skype for Business, but Microsoft MVP  has found the true building blocks. Brynteson took a look at the JSON events when sending a message and found some key information.

The JSON events Brynteson analyzed are as follows:

This taught the senior systems architech a few things. “This is absolutely not Skype for Business under the hood,” he wrote. “Microsoft has talked about the next gen Skype Consumer network and this is clearly going to that environment.”

Secondly, he said: “This is all driven via JSON and web services.  If you look at the language that is being used this is a very modern interface that is be used by several other players in the market.”

This applies not just to the messaging system, but also to audio and video sessions. Brynteson notes that this is likely just one step towards a bigger consolidation.

Microsoft Teams and Power BI

In other Teams news, the application is now available with PowerBI. Admins in Power BI can select Microsoft Teams integration when creating a group or team. This will form a tab for previously created dashboards and workspaces when you create a team.

All reports from Power BI will automatically be integrated into the new Teams service. With this feature, users can share and link reports directly. Microsoft sees this as a further extension of Office 365 Groups.

Whatever the underlying processes, Microsoft Teams is looking like a strong competitor. A recent announcement reveals Twitter integration, as well as open APIs and bot frameworks. The Skype Consumer network only makes the application look more attractive, and Slack may have its work cut out if it wants to retain users.

You can view Brynteson’s blog post here.