Kernal security check failure own

About a month ago, we reported a critical bug in Windows 10 that was causing Desktop Bridge apps to crash computers. In some cases, apps ported to the UWP platform would cause PCs to get stuck in an infinite boot loop.

Shortly afterward, Microsoft revealed that the issue had been resolved internally and a fix would be coming soon. It took a little while, but as of last week, the problem is fixed. Windows 10 build 14393.351 – KB3197954 should return normal functionality.

If you’re still stuck in that same boot loop, Microsoft recommends restoring your system to before you installed the app. You can then get the latest update via the usual method and continue as usual.

The company is also recommending some changes for developers. By including a line of code, they can ensure users don’t install Project Centennial apps on that specific build. Simply modify the AppManifest.xml file to say:

<TargetDeviceFamily Name="Windows.Desktop" MinVersion="10.0.14393.351" MaxVersionTested="10.0.14393.351"/>

Other Windows 10 Build 14393.351 Changes

Naturally, this Windows build also brings a number of other fixes and improvements, and we’ve listed those for you below:

  • “Improved reliability of Internet Explorer 11, Start, File Explorer, action center, graphics, and the Windows kernel.
  • Addressed issue that was causing System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) Management Console to crash in State view.
  • Connectivity issue from a 32-bit application to a Remote Desktop Gateway that doesn’t have HTTP tunneling enabled.
  • Addressed issue of updates not being restored when doing a system reset, even if those updates were permanently installed.
  • Issue that was causing domain logon attempts to fail on a Windows 10 Pro device after upgrading from Windows 10 Home.
  • Addressed issue that was causing failed logon counts of non-admin users without network logon permissions to be counted as cumulative, resulting in devices going into BitLocker recovery more frequently.
  • Improved support for websites by updating the HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) preload list.
  • Better support for IT administrators using Group Policy to block users updating the operating system from Windows Update.
  • Improved reliability and stability of the notification framework for enabling contextual notifications in File Explorer.
  • Addressed an issue that prevented System Center Configuration Manager from performing inventory uploads via Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) when Encrypting File System (EFS) has been disabled.
  • Additional issues with USB, Wi-Fi, clustering, setup, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer 11, licensing, PowerShell, Component Object Model (COM), Windows kernel, graphics, and Bluetooth.”

It’s not exactly clear why Microsoft didn’t make the Project Centennial fix clear in these patch notes, but it’s possible they were waiting on verification. Whatever the case, users will be happy to see increased stability across the board, including their favorite bridge apps.