PGS Gaming System Kickstarter

Funded in just three days, the idea of a portable Windows 10 games console has proved popular with gamers. The device has two analog sticks and a dual screen setup, suspiciously familiar to the DS in style but with the addition of two trigger buttons.

With a corny, out of sync funding video, PGS pitches two different versions of the device: the “Lite” for $230 and a “Hardcore” version for $280.

These prices are based on early bird Kickstarter support, however, so the final retail price could be significantly higher.

Interestingly, both devices will ship with an Android 6 dual boot so it can be used as a phone with full cellular capabilities,¬† as well as housing the Intel Atom X7 z8750 chipset. It’s in resolution, RAM and Storage that two devices start to show their differences.

Both devices support up to 512 GB of micro SD storage; native streaming from PC, Xbox One and PS4, and the latest Intel HD graphics accelerator.Battery life is listed as anywhere between five to eight hours depending on how demanding the title is, and can last for eight to ten hours while web browsing.

Battery life is listed as anywhere between five to eight hours depending on how demanding the title is, and can last for eight to ten hours while web browsing. It’s unclear if this applies to both devices, but given the reduction in specs it’s likely that the Lite would even out to around the same time.

Specifications

PGS Lite:

  • Display: IPS 1280×720, 267ppi
  • RAM: 4 GB
  • Storage: eMMC, 64 GB
  • Battery: Li-Po 4080 mAh

PGS Hardcore:

  • Display: AMOLED 2560×1440, 515ppi
  • RAM: 8GB
  • Storage: SSD 128 GB
  • Battery: Li-Po 6120 mAh

Possible Drawbacks

Despite the impressive specs for such a small device, frequent PC gamers such as myself will find its lack of graphical power off-putting. Playing at 25 frames per second is not ideal for most triple A titles, and results in a much less pleasant gameplay experience. Streaming from Steam and Xbox One remedies this somewhat, but its dependency on an internet connection makes the portability redundant in most cases.

Though the battery life is good, the question remains whether or not is sustainable as a daily smartphone device. The temptation to game in your downtime would always be there, and playing Arkham Asylum for an hour or two could mean that you don’t have enough juice to last out the day.

Despite this, the PGS is a big step forward for portable gaming, offering unprecedented  access to a whole range of titles, provided you can stomach playing with low graphics and framerate. As Microsoft make improvements to their gaming infrastructure and more games support Direct X 12,  devices like this are only going to seem more attractive.

You can check out their Kickstarter campaign here.