Windows  roadmap

A new Windows 10 roadmap website allows users to see exactly what features are available on the platform, and also what is coming soon, and even what’s in development.

At Build 2016 two weeks ago, Microsoft unveiled the Anniversary Update for Windows 10, which will be arriving in June with a host of new features and functionality.

The company has also been steadily introducing incremental updates to the Windows 10 platform since it launched last year, and keeping track of all those features is not easy.

In fact, it is close on impossible, especially with so many builds running at one time, such as Insiders Preview builds, internal builds, and of course end user builds.

Microsoft seems to understand this, so the company has published a Windows 10 roadmap that details the company’s plans for the platforms and what features is had and will have in the future.

Windows-10-roadmap

The roadmap splits Windows 10 into feature groups like “In Public Preview”, “Recently Available”, “In Development”, “Archive”, and “Canceled”. This means users can see exactly where a particular feature is and “Recently Available” and “In Public Preview” are those features which are already available to Insiders or end users.

In Development” is probably the category that holds the most interest, as it shows current features that Microsoft is working on, or at least the ones the company wants us to know about. Of course, these development features could go either way and either enter “Public Review” or be relegated to “Canceled,” but it is nice to be able to track progress in this way.

Such “In Development” features that stand out at first glance include Microsoft Edge – Web Notifications, Continuum Projecting on PCs, and Use Companion Devices (Android and Windows) to unlock your Windows PC.

Microsoft is billing Windows 10 roadmap for enterprise, but consumers and developers can get plenty out of these features. With huge changes coming to the platform in the current months, this is an easy way to keep track of exactly what Microsoft is adding.

SOURCE: Microsoft