Microsoft Edge Logo

Considering Build 2016 only wrapped a few days ago, Microsoft is doing a stellar job continuing the feature announcements, focusing on the Edge browser on Monday during the Edge Web Summit 2016.

The company has announced its roadmap for its web browser for the year ahead, and just like Build last week, there is plenty to be interested in.

While the Edge browser has some improvements to make before it is really on an even footing with rivals (the Windows 10 Anniversary Update will help with that), the browser is undoubtedly very secure.

Indeed, as Edge approaches a year old, Microsoft has used the Edge Summit to reveal that the browser has suffered no zero-day exploits during its time on release and has no known exploits likely to target it.

Needless to say, no zero day exploits is a huge achievement and shows that Microsoft is really taking security seriously with its latest browser. Other good news saw Microsoft confirm a 75% reduction in RCE (Remote Code Execution) exploits that affected its new browser in the first 5 servicing months.

Secure Edge

Microsoft has long talked up the security prowess of the Edge browser and has backed that security to the point of arrogance at some point. For example, when the company rolled out EMET (Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit), it said the anti-zero-day tool was not needed on the ultra-secure Edge browser.

Given the advanced technologies used to protect Microsoft Edge, including industry-leading sandboxing, compiler, and memory-management techniques, EMET 5.5 mitigations do not apply to Edge.

– EMET team

Compared to Internet Explorer (which became an infested mess at times), Microsoft seems to be on a surer footing with Edge, although non-zero-day vulnerabilities are still an expected threat. Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE’s) on Internet Explorer were up to around 25 during 2015, but for the Edge browser Redmond says there has been a 75% reductions in RCE CVE’s.

The only question mark remaining is whether the Edge browser has had a free ride because at the moment the nascent browser is not on enough devices. It’s possible that its young age is working in its favor, but Microsoft revealed today the browser is already on 150 million devices.

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