Windows Server

The support timeline for Windows Server support will be maintained even though Microsoft will cut support for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.

Microsoft has confirmed that it will continue to support Windows Server 2012 beyond the lifecycle of Windows 7 and Windows 8.1, which Redmond says it will stop supporting in mid-2017.

The decision means older versions of the Windows Server OS will now be able to operate on Intel’s sixth generation Skylake Core processors.

In a blog post issued last week, Microsoft said “There is no change to our current policy,” and that it remains committed to supporting Windows Server.

It was an interesting decision considering Redmond had revealed in January that it would cut the support cycle of Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 by 30 months, even for PCs running the Skylake silicon.

Windows Server 2012 Support

The company also changed its overall support policy, stating that products will need the latest silicon at that time to be supported, but only if they have the latest Windows platform. Microsoft did not mention Windows Server at the time, leading some to assume that the company was also cutting short planned support for the server based OS.

Instead the company will now support Windows Server on machines packing the Skylake architecture, and even those without it. The hardware must be certified however, before the Windows Server SKU moves from “mainstream” to “extended” support, as detailed in the blog post:

For Windows Server, we outline the Microsoft Support Lifecycle as consisting of five years of mainstream support followed by five years of extended support. This lifecycle is important in terms of our support policies as well as the timeframe for which new devices and systems can be certified. We allow new systems to be submitted for certification up to the point when the OS transitions to extended support.

SOURCE: Microsoft Blog