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Sony has officially sold 30.2 million units of PlayStation4 as of November 22. This is a major breakthrough announcement since the release of PS4 in November 2013.

“PS4 [has the] fastest and strongest growth in PlayStation hardware history,” according to Sony in a press release. It truly is a continuous development for Sony after announcing that PS4 is the number one selling console in the US, just one year after the official release.

Sony´s 30 million figure looks less impressive when compared to Nintendo Wii´s 45 million in the same two years’ timeframe after hitting the market.

Microsoft´s Xbox One remains substantially under PS4’s figures as total sales are said to be only between 15 and 18 million. With the last earnings release in October Microsoft had changed its reporting practices for Xbox consoles. For the first time, concrete numbers of Xbox shipments were missing and they just reported “engagement” based on Xbox Live usership as the leading statistic.

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Microsoft’s struggle

It seems like Microsoft has finally surrendered to the dominating PlayStation 4 in terms of market share. With the change in reporting they avoid the negative 1:1 sales comparisons, as the Xbox is usually far behind the PS4. At the same time, as user engagement on the relatively young Xbox Live is growing, Microsoft will be able to report positive numbers.

Although Xbox One escalated sales after the release of Halo 5 last month, PS4 is still taking its lead over Microsoft´s console. According to Ars Technica, Microsoft is possibly trying to come close to Sony over the upcoming holidays.

“With Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and then the Christmas shopping periods approaching, Microsoft will no doubt be hoping to close that gap—but with both consoles at around the same price point (£250/$300/€300), and some strong games on both sides of the fence, we can’t imagine that holiday season sales will differ much from the norm.”

Xbox One cannot possibly outsell the PS4 on an annual basis before 2024, an analysis of Ars Technica suggests. The situation is certainly a call for action for Microsoft to continue on taking actions to maintain its console in the market.

Source: Ars Technica via Ars Technica UK